Why I'm So "Over" Hosting Big Birthday Parties

My kids have had their last big birthday party: at home, at a park, at a party place. I am so done organizing them, turn me over.
 
Kids in a bounce house
 
This year's shindig was Zach's seventh birthday party. My husband and I combined didn't have seven birthday parties during our childhood. I had exactly two, both of which were super small and simple, because my parents had little money and few friends.
 
Here are my reasons for ending the insanity of large birthday parties for my kids:
 
The Cost
I'm pretty lazy as far as event planning goes, so I usually pay a place like Pump It Up to entertain the kids with inflatable bouncy houses. I still have to pay for the snacks, the plates, cups, napkins, pizza, juice, water, cupcakes, and party favors.
 
Setup and Cleanup
This year my in-laws were in town and were a HUGE help in setting and cleaning up the party we had at home. It was a bit of a small miracle that they were all there at the same time, so I feel like having this party as the last one is ending on a high note. When I have to do most of the work myself, I get really anxious, resentful, and end up being a pretty bitchy hostess. Not fun for anyone.
 
The Guest List
We had almost 60 guests at our party this year. It's an awkward feeling when you get a "No" reply from someone, pump your fist, and yell, "Yay!" I don't understand the families who can invite everyone from their kid's classroom. We had guests from my son's school, our playgroup, our neighborhood, and from friends we knew before we had kids.
 
The Gifts
This year I said "No gifts" on the invitation, and most people complied, which was great. At previous parties, the kids would get dozens of gifts, which were quality gifts, but my kids were not particularly grateful, "Oh, it's just a book," and of course, they were only interested in the toys for a few days before piling them up all over my house.
 
The Entitlement
This year Zach didn't like that I had invited one boy from his class that he sometimes gets into fights with, and that I didn't invite Seamus, a boy he really likes. He told me that Seamus told him, "It's your birthday party, you should get to invite whoever you want and you should get to do stuff. It's your party!"
 
Zach threw a pretty good-sized fit about the guest list, not being able to have separate themes for him and his sister, and not being able to do a big project, like building Mythbuster-type rigs and conducting experiments.
 
I was initially mad because I felt like he was ungrateful for all of the work I do, and then I remembered that I'm the one insisting we do the party in the first place. He did have a good point. He's old enough now that he can help plan his birthday celebration.
 
Honestly, the kids' birthday parties were the one time of year I could see some of my friends, but we're just going to have to make more of an effort to get together during the rest of the year.
 
From here on out, my kids get mini-cupcakes at school with their classmates and a family dinner. Maybe Zach could invite two or three other kids out for lunch at a pizza place.
 
My parenting philosophy continues to evolve into keeping things as simple as possible.
 
How do you celebrate your kids' birthdays?

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