Why It's Time to Put the "You'll Change Your Mind" Childfree Misconception to Rest

Slate recently asked to hear from the childfree who are happy, and they have been posting on what they've received. "Combing through the nearly 300 submissions", their post today talked about how "a constant refrain jumps out: People with kids do not believe people without kids when they say they will never have kids."

I want to put this notion to rest, but before I do, a few words about Slate's shout out to the "childfree who are happy." While it is great to see a request to hear from the childfree, wanting to hear from the "happy" ones sure implies a belief that there are the "unhappy" ones. Who are more likely to be the less than happy ones? The childless, not the childfree -- "childless" meaning those who want children but do not have them.

The first thing to put to rest: There are happy and unhappy people in both parent and childfree camps. How often do we see requests for parents who are happy to write in--with the implication that there are those who are unhappy too? Right. Not often if at all. The pronatalist assumption is, of course you are happy being a parent! And if you are not, it is taboo to talk about that!

But I digress.

At La Vie Childfree, I asked an On-the-Ground question about the most common stereotypes the childfree say they have been subjected to, and the "You'll change your mind" misconception came out at the Top of the list.

Now, parents, here is why it is time to put this misconception to rest. It insinuates that you know the childfree better than they know themselves--that they don’t know themselves well enough to know what they "really" want—and that of course, is kids! Believe me, the childfree know themselves and what they want better than parents who think they do!

Often this "You don’t know it now, but you Will want a child day" comes with the idea that the childfree will change their minds when they meet that special someone--that when they find him or her they will want to make a baby with that person. To this I say, Not true. What is? The childfree look for the mr. or ms. right who feel the same way they do about not having parenthood accompany what they want in married life.

Granted, people do change their minds about things, and it can happen that someone who is childfree changes his/her mind to have children as s/he goes along in life. But having the attitude that that is what is going to occur--that "You’re just like us, you just don’t know it yet" -- is just not accurate.

More than anything it reflects a mindset that is central to pronatalism--that having children is what everyone is supposed to do in life. It is an example of the baby matrix - like in the movie, The Matrix, the matrix is something that feels so real, but we find out it is not. The more you dig into pronatalism, the more you see that it is the same--pronatalism is a set of beliefs we have come to believe so strongly they feel so real we believe they are "true" - when really, either the beliefs no longer serve us, or have never been true in the first place.

What is true? Everyone does not want children to be the central focus of their lives. We are all not destined to have children. So parents, I say -- believe the childfree when they say they never want kids!  

Laura Carroll

Author of The Baby Matrix: Why Freeing Our Minds From Outmoded Thinking About Parenthood & Reproduction Will Create a Better World

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